Craig Scoffone Fine Art Photography

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
A CONVERSATION WITH CRAIG SCOFFONE

When Do You Make Art ? Lighting conditions are a big indicator as to when I will do a shoot for my own works. For instance, if I have an idea for shooting silhouettes, I will do them early or late in the day, so that the natural light is low and will allow the best results.

Is It A Regular Time ? Doing fine art shoots for me are a matter of juggling other things in my schedule to allow the time to create new works.

Is It After A Specific Inspiration ? When I get a new idea, sometimes it's like a lightning bolt. An idea will come to me and I feel an urgency to do that shoot, create the image, get it out of my system, and onto the computer, the paper, and then, hopefully, under glass - if the image is as strong as I had originally envisioned.

Do You Have A Routine ? As a freelance commercial photographer your routine often revolves around what commissioned works come in. Allowing time for post production on the computer, and other, non-photographic things, to be done that need to be done, pretty much defines my schedule, or routine, such as it is.

How Does Your Art Evolve ? Photography is very much a craft, the more you practice it, than you learn more things, by trial and error if nothing else. But as far as the ' evolution ' of my work, I would have to say it is the experimentation of different techniques that most define the changing of my work, along pretty much a straight timeline. My technical prowess has been good for a very long time now, so I wouldn't say that aspect of my work is an obvious, upward curve. I feel that my early works, are just as well crafted and composed, as my most recent works.

Are You Intentional Right From The Start ? The actual recording of the image in camera, is only the half way point in the creative process. I never know the full potential of an image until I have sat down at the computer and worked with that image, much like the darkroom procedures back when I was shooting and processing my own black and white film, and doing my own darkroom printing. There wasn't an idea I would not try, because my curiosity, from early on, until still today, is what drives my continued interest in this medium.

What Makes Your Art Worthwhile And Why - Not Only To You, But To Others As Well ? I get great satisfaction being able to ponder an idea, or being open to new ideas during the shooting process. This is one of the things I feel I'm really good at, the finished work provides one a true sense of accomplishment. Really good art, a presentation that looks absolutely beautiful on the wall is a universal pleasure. If something that I have done, meets that criteria, then I would think others would also benefit from enjoying this work, and hopefully, on their own walls. It is nothing less than a great honor to me, when someone feels moved by one of my framed images, to purchase that work, support my efforts, and invite my work into their homes, and into their lives. It really is a modest, little act of immortality when this occurs. I'm always humbled and grateful when it does.

Is Your Art About You ? Yes, it is. When I have thought about it, it is what and how I interpreted an idea, a composition, a theme, with my accumulated knowledge of craft, to make that final image look the way it does. Good art is about sharing the view inside the head of the artist, at least as much, as good art invokes an individual response from the viewer - a potentially, two pronged scenario, is what is available, as a result of the act of viewing good art.

Does Your Art Embody Particular Beliefs, Thoughts, Particular Philosophies ? There are some artists, who feel the need to convey political opinions or convey unpleasant realities of the human condition, and I applaud that. But I want to seek pleasure from my creative pursuits, and quite simply, I would not frame one of my photographs that I would not want to hang on my own walls, - I'm going for beauty, and the many interesting ways it can be presented, in my photographs.

How Do You Know When You Are Done With An Image ? The final phase of working with an image is in computer, and sometimes there is more than one finished version of an original file that I end up with. I then go back later and decide which version I like the most.

What Makes You Step Back And Say, ' This Is It, This Is Exactly What I Want ' ? When I get tired of screwing with an image on computer - that sometimes occurs. Any longer than this, I sometimes feel an intervention might be in order. That is a very good time to stop, and walk away for awhile.

Is There A Logical Progression Between One Work of Art And The Next ? Does One Lead Directly To The Next ? Photography is a medium where good works might come in bunches, or not at all. The way I create my photographic art, is that I will experiment with a few different techniques during a single shoot, and the end results get separated into portfolios of images of similar techniques. Different styles are being created concurrently - so there are often a ' multiple ' progressions of my work. I'm very diverse in my thinking, and my creative process. So my output is multi directional at the same time - I need to do things this way in order to keep myself interested and curios.

How Do Individual Pieces Of Your Art Relate To One Another ? The most obvious common denominators in my work, are either theme, mostly, or by technique.